Tyre fitting help please

For now, I lumped all the pre-war cars together, I would LOVE for there to be enough demand to split it into groups (hint...hint, post here about your pre-war Singer)
casadecabra
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Tyre fitting help please

Postby casadecabra » Thu Jul 07, 2016 7:58 am

I have just restored two wire wheels (Le Mans with offset spokes) and would appreciate any suggestions about the procedure for tyre fitting, e.g. which side (spoke or no spoke) do I start off from and at what stage do I insert the inner tube. I've done it myself many years ago on a motorcycle wheel when I think I temporarily put electrical tape around the rim to protect the paint.

David

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Peter McKercher
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Re: Tyre fitting help please

Postby Peter McKercher » Thu Jul 07, 2016 11:52 am

I put down a cloth tarp on the floor to protect the wheel then liberally apply lanolin hand cleaner to the rim of the tire. The first side of the tire slips on easily. Then insert the tube and position the valve. Then slip the other rim of the tire around the wheel rim.
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cdk84
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Re: Tyre fitting help please

Postby cdk84 » Fri Aug 04, 2017 5:23 am

Peter's description is very good.

As it's been a while since you did this, I would simply remind you how easy it is to pinch the tube with the tyre irons. In my opinion, this is one of those places where taking that extra measure of care will pay off handily.

One way to avoid difficulty is to be certain the valve stem is positioned very precisely relative to its hole in the rim.

Another trick is to put just the slightest bit of air into the tube --an amount that just provides the tube takes form, but isn't firm. This works well because, with this small amount of pressure, when you're fishing around blindly with the tyre irons you can feel the tube pushing back against the tools. It's harder to pinch the tube with the tyre irons when the tube's not flat inside the tyre.

Let us know how you get on.

Very Best of Luck, David

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Peter McKercher
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Re: Tyre fitting help please

Postby Peter McKercher » Fri Aug 04, 2017 11:03 am

FYI, I do not use tyre irons with this method. Strictly by hand so no paint is damaged by prying.
Peter McKercher
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Pre war Singer Specialist and Collector
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cdk84
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Re: Tyre fitting help please

Postby cdk84 » Sat Aug 12, 2017 4:17 am

Hi Peter, Hi Casadacabra,

I've found that, by inflating the tube as mentioned above, there's a considerably reduced risk of tube damage. The tube seems to be more likely to be caught on a tyre iron or worse, punctured, if the tube is not slightly inflated.

Peter, your point about chipped paint is a worthy one. When I have to use a tool, I don't place it directly against the rim. I place a piece of rubber, folded in half and cut from a bicycle tube, between the rim and the tyre iron. That way I can apply gentle leverage --a bit of persuasion-- without damaging the rim, or if I'm careful, the inner tube either.

Best of luck.

David

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Re: Tyre fitting help please

Postby cdk84 » Sat Aug 12, 2017 5:07 am

Hi Peter, Hi Casadacabra,

I've found that, by inflating the tube as mentioned above, there's a considerably reduced risk of tube damage. The tube seems to be more likely to be caught on a tyre iron or worse, punctured, if the tube is not slightly inflated.

Peter, your point about chipped paint is a worthy one. When I have to use a tool, I don't place it directly against the rim. I place a piece of rubber, folded in half and cut from a bicycle tube, between the rim and the tyre iron. That way I can apply gentle leverage --a bit of persuasion if needed-- without damaging the rim, or if I'm lucky and careful, the inner tube either.

Let us know if you learn something new in your experience, and how it goes.

David

casadecabra
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Joined: Sat Aug 06, 2011 12:11 pm
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Re: Tyre fitting help please

Postby casadecabra » Sat Aug 12, 2017 7:47 am

I successfully fitted four tyres shortly after my initial post. This was over a year ago so my memory is a little hazy but I recall the following points:

Use a safe lubricant (i.e. guaranteed not to harm rubber or butyl) copiously. I used a 250 ml tub and a bit of the appropriately named 'Tyre Lube' by Proclean available from motor cycle shops.

Put thick layers of blanket on the floor and work from the inside of the wheel so as to reduce the visibility of any accidental scuff marks. Using plenty of lubricant push (by hand) one side of the tyre on to the wheel. Fit the inner tube into the tyre, inflate a little and make sure the tube is sitting happily within the tyre. Let most of the air out.

Place the wheel on the blanket and push the second bead over the rim as much as possible. Don a pair of heavy boots (rubber soled for choice) and work your feet around the tyre just outside the rim of the wheel. The trick is to squeeze both walls of the tyre as far into the well of the wheel as possible on the opposite side to your feet. With plently of lubricant and a bit of body bounce the second bead of the tyre should slide over the rim without problems and certainly without tools. Pump up gradually, checking to make sure the tube isn't trapped anywhere and that the valve is sitting radially.

Anyway, it worked for me - this was with Longstone tyres.

David Bayliss


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